Douglas Crets

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Giving Credibility to the Shadow Education System

Columbia University Reviews To Be Heard

The film will be screened at the IFC Center’s DocuWeeks: Theatrical Showcase August 19-25, and at the Rooftop Films: Summer Screenings in Chelsea on August 13th and East Harlem on August 16th

Liz Hoelzle sat down to watch To Be Heard and wrote a review about it for the Arts & Humanities at Teacher’s College program at Columbia University.

Each of the teachers featured in To Be Heard display an extraordinary commitment to their students and seem to have a calling to impart a love of literacy. They continually impress upon their students the idea that controlling language is a route to freedom. Legiardi-Laura stresses this idea when he states, “If you don’t control language in this world, you go to jail. Whether it’s a physical jail or a mental jail doesn’t really matter.”

As “the tripod” continues to grow and flourish in their poetry, even experiencing the thrill of participating in a citywide teen poetry slam competition which one of them wins, it seems that everything will turn out just fine. But more challenges await them on the horizon, and their commitment to poetry and to one another is tested. The audience rejoices and cries along with the characters, and is ever inspired by their consistent reliance on poetry for survival.

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Filed under: Digital Learning, Work, , , , ,

“Future Self” Will Take What’s Behind Door Number Two, Please

Here’s an interesting study from Columbia University about one’s connection to one’s future self, and how it determines choices one makes.

Impact on education? As far as I can see, helping a student make some strong connection between the learning happening now and the reward or the experience of learning’s outcomes in the future is what a school system should do. Are we doing that well now?

 The June 2011 edition of the Journal of Consumer Research features research from Professor Daniel Bartels, marketing professor at Columbia Business School, and Oleg Urminsky, marketing professor at The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, that depicts how consumers feeling or not feeling connected to their future selves impacts their spending and savings decisions. The researchers conducted a series of experiments, manipulating the degree to which subjects felt connected to their future selves. When discontinuity with the future self is anticipated, people behave more impatiently – speeding up the consumption of utility (in this case, gift cards) – than when connectedness to the future self is expected. The research which examines how people weigh smaller, immediate rewards against larger, long-term rewards, is part of a growing area of study in psychology on intertemporal trade-offs.

 

In the first study, the researchers asked a group of college seniors — three weeks before graduation — to read a passage that described college graduation either as an event that would prompt a major change in their identities or as an event that would prompt only a relatively trivial change. Compared to students who read the passage describing graduation as a small change, those who read a description of the event as a major change were much more likely to make more impatient choices, choosing to receive a gift certificate worth $120 in the next week rather than wait a year for up to $240.

 

In a subsequent study, the authors asked people to evaluate their sense of connectedness and similarity to their future selves. Three weeks later, they were asked them to choose between smaller gift cards they could use right away or larger gift cards that would require waiting. “Those who had felt more connected to their future selves then made more patient choices and were more willing to wait for a higher-valued gift card,” Professor Urminsky explained.

 

Professor Bartels discussed the significance of the study. “Our work suggests that you can motivate people to hold onto their money, or make other, more prudent decisions by increasing their sense of connectedness to their future selves. Rather than trying to guilt ourselves into making prudent financial choices or creating complicated incentive schemes, we can instead look for simple, straightforward ways to foster our sense that what matters most will be preserved in our future selves, so that we can achieve goals that are important.”

Filed under: Digital Learning, Influence, Work, , , , , , ,

We Are Content. We Are Curation. Open the Doors, See All the People.

Interest = Content

Note: Thank you to Sree Srinavasan for putting on Social Media Weekend at Columbia University, and for coming up with a great list for social media use and work.

If you at all depend on the Internet for news, social trends, or innovation ideas in business, projects or fun, it is likely that someone is thinking about it, too.

Now, on to the story. We are content. We are curation. Open the doors, see all the people!

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Filed under: Digital Learning, Influence, Tech, Work, , , , , , , ,

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